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RESEARCH

NIKKB RESEARCH UNIT

Towards 2022, NIKKB research will focus on developing customised treatment for the individual patient, research into how we can implement new knowledge in daily practice and understand the lifelong trajectory of musculoskeletal disease.

Focus

NIKKB'S RESEARCH STRATEGY 2018-2022

The Research Unit at NIKKB has formulated a strategy outlining the institute's research priorities for the period 2018-2022.

Download it here

Research

The strategic aim of the research efforts at NIKKB is to continue to contribute new knowledge in the musculoskeletal field by focusing on solving specific challenges at the level of both the patient and society, specifically:

 

  • Patients with musculoskeletal problems experience different clinical courses, which is why we will continue our work to establish ‘customised’ interventions based on new knowledge.
  • Our ambition is to focus on implementation research where new knowledge about the barriers to, and methods for, promoting the systematic application of research findings is further developed and embedded in daily clinical practice.
  • At NIKKB, our research has always sought to understand the life trajectories of musculoskeletal disease. This will still apply. We will continue to study these clinical courses in order to develop insights that are useful and practical in prevention and treatment.

 

Research focus

To meet these strategic priorities, the following research areas will be the principal focus up to the end of 2022:

 

  1. Patient profiles & differentiated care
  2. Implementation research & knowledge translation
  3. Musculoskeletal heath from a life course perspective with a special focus on spinal health

 

Read more about our research focus under the section Project Areas in the menu.

 

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News

Back pain is annoying to many people but for some it can have serious consequences. The risk of being away from work due to sickness increases when one has to carry out physically demanding work, and with that comes increased risk of losing one’s job as the consequence of having to go on sick leave. For about 10 % of everyone, who develops lower back pain, the pain becomes chronic, rendering them unfit for work with subsequent sick leave and unemployment in the end.

 

In most cases it is impossible to determine one single reason for back pain; the…

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Busy and inspiring days at the CARL summit

Since Monday, the 13 young CARL fellows have been fully occupied with the first of three summits.

 

The summit is held at the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) in Odense, Denmark. It is an inspiring mix of talks, workshops and social features, intended to bring the researchers together as a strong group within research in the chiropractic field. During the summit, the researchers have had presentations from a long line of researchers in management in theory and practice, how to construct a career as a researcher and how to become a good Head of Research.

 

They have also…

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Research project receives substantial financial support

A new research project focussing on work retention in employees with musculoskeletal and physically demanding jobs has been awarded 1.5 m. Danish Kroner (approx. 200 000 €) in financial backing from the Danish Working Environment Research Fund.

 

The project is named “Way to go – Development of a joint effort to prevent, retain at work and rehabilitate employees with musculoskeletal disease and physically demanding work”.

 

Despite a general decrease in sickness absence statistics in Denmark in recent years, musculoskeletal pain continues to be a major cause of work disability in cleaners and other workers with physically demanding…

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Is there a relationship between physical activity level and back pain in adolescents?

The level of physical activity among adolescents can influence their risk of developing back pain, a new study by a group of researchers including Jan Hartvigsen and Lise Hestbæk from NIKKB/Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics (IOB) at the University of Southern Denmark has revealed.

 

The more physically active, the greater the risk of back pain, the study concludes. The researchers followed a group of adolescents aged 11 to 13 over a two year period to study to what degree physical activity caused pain in the neck, back and lower back during the two years.

 

The participants…

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How and why do sports injuries typically occur in children and adolescents?

For some time there has been increasing focus on activity and sports among children and adolescents, and there are many advantages in increased activity and participation in sport. However, the increase in sports activities among children and adolescents also causes an increase in sports injuries. Now a group of researchers have conducted a systematic literature review to provide an overview of the most common injuries in a number of sports and where they may occur. The overview is of particular interest to chiropractors who treat many athletes, children and young people, but there are also interesting points for other chiropractors.…

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