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RESEARCH

NIKKB RESEARCH UNIT

Towards 2022, NIKKB research will focus on developing customised treatment for the individual patient, research into how we can implement new knowledge in daily practice and understand the lifelong trajectory of musculoskeletal disease.

Focus

NIKKB'S RESEARCH STRATEGY 2018-2022

The Research Unit at NIKKB has formulated a strategy outlining the institute's research priorities for the period 2018-2022.

Download it here

Researchers in Sweden have identified four simple living rules that can reduce the risk of back pain considerably: Drop cigarettes, drink moderate amounts of alcohol, get regular exercise and be sure to get a daily intake of fruits and vegetables.

 

An extensive research experiment at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm is the first to demonstrate the link between a healthy lifestyle and lifestyle diseases. The research experiment was conducted in the form of a public survey of 9000 men and women in Stockholm County, and the results are remarkable: Among the women who followed the four living rules, 9 percent ended up with lasting back pain, while 21 percent of the women in the study, who did not follow the rules, ended up getting permanent back pain. The risk of getting permanent back pain was reduced by 35 percent if you followed some of the rules and by 52 percent if you followed all four living rules.

 

The tendency was the same among men, with the difference that the men did not generally develop long-term back pain to the same extent as women in the study.

 

It comes as no surprise to the researchers that a healthy lifestyle is a good way to prevent lifestyle diseases, but the study equips scientists with the first research results demonstrating a consistency in relation to back pain, says Tony Bohmann, a researcher at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

 

Jan Hartvigsen, professor and Head of Research at the IOB and Senior Researcher at NIKKB, endorses the conclusions of the study from the Karolinska Institute:

 

- We know from recent research that if you have good habits, you are generally in better health and therefore have less back pain. Severe and chronic problems are often in an interactive process with a general poor health, says Jan Hartvigsen to Newspaq.